In the shrinking city, this is a moment of increasing wildness, at the intersection of increasing invasive species, abandonment and vacancy, and an apparent loosening of control over public and private green space. Phenomena and trends from economics, politics, demographics, and the natural sciences converge at this effect: increasing disorder and decay, with a resurgence of nature and unkempt spaces. As humans, we have a long cultural and evolutionary history with wilderness and nature, narratives that continue to develop today, impacting how we react to, perceive and ultimately live within the wilder city.

The papers and projects in this collection contribute to the exploration of the construct of “wildness” by investigating material concerning the range of issues above and beyond. These papers are the result of an interdisciplinary course welcoming students from a variety of backgrounds and programs, and encouraging synthesis across boundaries.

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Submissions from 2014

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The Climate Change Games: Planning for Resiliency in New York City, Jordyn Conway

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City Wild Seminar: Abandonment Invasives and Losing Control Syllabus, Spring 2014, Susan Dieterlen

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Make Use in Syracuse, Nolan Ediger

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Dredging: What is it and How Can We Fix and Re-use Contaminated Dredged Material?, McLean Fleming

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The Effects of Urban Stream Restoration on Shrinking Cities, Andrea Fortman

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Analyzing the Economic and Energetic Sustainability of Pursuing Solar Energy in New Orleans, Louisiana, Jacob Gaskill

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Green Infrastructure, Zach Kalette

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The Impacts of Invasive Plant Species on Human Health, Hayley Kopelson

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Viable Freeganism?, Nathan LaPierre

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Rewilding the European Landscape: An Unconventional Approach to Land Management, Rachelle McKnight

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Shrinking Cities as the Next Healthy Cities: Utilizing Vacancy to Create a Walkable City, Elysa Smigielski